Sing & Ring in Spring

 

Spring is the perfect time to sing and ring about nature’s glory.  ChimeWorks offers some suggestions below for lesson plans using a variety of teaching techniques and objectives.

With these folksongs, we can enrich our students with a greater appreciation of the beauty of the world around them.  Many of these songs have been passed through the centuries and are classic examples of fine musical literature for young musicians.

All  of these lesson plans are available for immediate purchase and digital download at the cost of $2.29 each – just pennies per student – in our “Handchimes in the Classroom & Rehearsal” store.

 

Lesson Plans with Chordal Harmonization

 

Come, Follow Me

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 3
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Nature
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Come Follow is an English folk song dating from the late 17th century.  It was written by John Hilton in 1652.  It is a three part round or canon.

 

I Love The Mountains

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 4
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Nature
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

I Love the Mountains is a traditional American campfire song passed down through generations.

 

Lesson Plans with Harmonization by Ostinati

Sakura

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Topic: Spring
  • Language: Japanese
  • Origin: Japan

Sakura is a traditional Japanese folk song telling of springtime and cherry blossoms.  It dates from the late the Edo period between 1603 and 1868.  It is based on the Phrygian mode.

 

Come, Let Us All A-Maying Go

  •  Use: Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Spring
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Come, Let Us All A-Maying Go is a three part round or canon.  John Hilton the younger was an Early English Baroque composer.

 

Lesson Plans Using Icons to Teach Music Literacy

Bunessan (Morning Has Broken)

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Icons
  • Topic: Nature, Praise
  • Language: English
  • Origin: Scotland

The melody, Bunessan, was named after a town in Scotland.  During the 19th century it was set to the text of Morning Has Broken.

 

Baa, Baa Black Sheep

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Type: Icons
  • Topic: Animals, Nursery Rhyme
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Baa, Baa Black Sheep is an English nursery rhymed dating back from 1731.  Its original context is thought to be a complaint on the taxation of wool.

Peace & Harmony in the Classroom and World

 

It’s always good to incorporate life lessons into our music.  During the past weeks, we have witnessed students from around the globe become organizers of change.  They have been using their voices to condemn policy, violence, social injustice and hatred to name a few.  These leaders were formed in their homes, communities, centers of faith and in their classrooms.  Through lessons in the music classroom, we can also share in the social development of our children.

At ChimeWorks, we offer the lessons below in the theme of peace.  They combine a great text and tune with easy-to-teach harmonization which will work well in the classroom or concert stage.   All are available for immediate purchase and digital download at the cost of $2.29 each – just pennies per student – in our “Handchimes in the Classroom & Rehearsal” store.

 

Lessons Using Chords to Harmonize Singing

Dona Nobis Pacem

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Europe

Dona Nobis Pacem is a traditional song in round or canon form.  The text translates to Grant Us Peace and is taken from the Latin mass.  While the source of this canon is unknown, it is believed to date from the 16th century.

 

Greeting of Peace

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Chords: 5
  • Language: English, Hebrew
  • Origin: Israel

 Hevenu Shalom A’leychem is a traditional Jewish greeting wishing the goodness of a peace-filled life.

 

Peace Like a River

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Chords: 3
  • Language: English
  • Origin: African American Spiritual

Peace Like A River is an African American Spiritual.  The first three items of the “fruit of the Spirit” (Galatians 5:22) are love, joy, and peace. This spiritual compares the peace of God to a placidly flowing river, the joy of Christ to a merrily bubbling fountain, and the love of God to a deep, wide ocean.

 

Shalom Chaverim

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Chords: 3
  • Canon:Y es
  • Language: English, Hebrew
  • Origin: Israel

Meaning farewell, good friends, Shalom Chaverim is a traditional song sung at parting.  It may be sung in English or Hebrew. It may be used as a three-part canon (round).  It may be used for welcoming guests or in teaching friendship.

 

Lessons Using Ostinati Taught by Rote to Harmonize Singing

Good and Joyous

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: English, Hebrew
  • Origin: Israel

Good and Joyous is a traditional Hebrew song usually sung in canon (round) form.  It is based on Psalm 133.  In the text, the word people may be used in place of brothers.

 

Happy Days

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

Happy Days is a four-part canon that has been sung for generations.  Its origin is unknown.

 

Make New Friends

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

Make New Friends is a traditional campfire song sung by Girl Scouts in North America.

All Creatures Great and Small – Lesson Plans about Animals using Handchimes

Spring is on the way and this time of year welcomes songs about furry and feathered friends.  At ChimeWorks, we have lesson plans that will surely delight your students as they sing and chime along to some new and some familiar tunes while learning how to harmonize a melody or follow the steps to early music reading.

ChimeWorks uses three teaching methods with the folk songs below to implement handchime use in the classroom or singing rehearsal.  With icons, students will develop eye – hand coordination by initially using symbols or colors to introduce music literacy and gradually progressing to score reading.  By using chords indicated by the teacher pointing to a chart, students can easily harmonize their singing.  And finally, with ostinati lessons, harmonic patterns are taught by rote to harmonize the singing and develop more independence when playing.

All of the lessons are available for immediate purchase and digital download for pennies per student.  Only one copy of the lesson is needed for teachers to bring effective music-making and success to the classroom.  Browse our complete store here for other creative and successful lesson plans.

When using these lessons, be sure to check out Malmark’s colored bands to wrap on the handchimes which act as a valuable teaching aid when using colors.

 

 

Lessons using Icons

 B-I-N-G-O

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

B-I-N-G-O is an English language folk song dating back to the late 1700s.

 

Baa, Baa Black Sheep

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Baa, Baa Black Sheep is an English nursery rhymed dating back from 1731.  Its original context is thought to be a complaint on the taxation of wool.

 

The Farmer in the Dell

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Language: English
  • Origin: Germany

The Farmer in The Dell is a nursery rhyme and children’s game.  The song originated in Germany and was brought to North America in the late 19th century.

 

Old MacDonald Had a Farm

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

Old MacDonald Had A Farm dates to the early years of the 20th century.

 

Lessons using Chords

 Six Little Ducks

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Chords: 2
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Six Little Ducks is an English language nursery rhyme and singing game.

 

Ev’ryone But Me

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Chords:3
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

Ev’ryone But Me is an American folk song with roots in New England.

 

Go Tell Aunt Rhody

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Chords: 3
  • Language: English
  • Origin: France

Jean-Jacques Rousseau composed the original tune as a gavotte or dance in the mid-1700s.  The tune later traveled through England, Germany to New England where the folk text was added.  Countries around the world use the tune for various folk texts.

 

Old MacDonald

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Chords: 3
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

Old MacDonald Had A Farm dates to the early years of the 20th century.  The tune will be familiar and allow the students to focus on chiming.

 

Lessons using Ostinati

The Frogs

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

The Frogs is a traditional campfire song sung by Girl Scouts in North America.

 

Sweetly Sings the Donkey

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2
  • Canon: Yes
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Sweetly Sings the Donkey is a traditional song that children love to sing.  Additional verses may be created by adding animals and their sounds.

Handchimes and Black History Month

 

February 1st is just around the corner and the observance of Black History Month arrives with it.  To celebrate and educate about this rich cultural heritage, a great resource can be found in the African American Spiritual, perhaps the most significant type of American folk song.  By teaching the history, text and tunes of Spirituals we can impart a deeper understanding and awareness of this part of American culture.

Understanding the history of Spirituals and the different types will help those singing and listening have a greater understanding.  An informative synopsis produced by the Library of Congress offers a deeper look into this art form and can be found in the article, African American Spirituals.  We suggest that a brief history and explanation of the type of Spiritual being performed be shared with your students and audience to offer them a greater connection to what is being presented.

Using handchimes, we can introduce Spirituals in a number of ways.  Some of these resources include singing and some do not; either way, we recommend that the text and melody be taught by rote first to insure a deeper understanding of the song and its original use before introducing the handchime parts or score.

The resources below can be found on the ChimeWorks website and are available for immediate purchase and digital download.

Handchimes in the General Music Classroom or Choral Rehearsal 

Kum-Bah-Yah (Chords)

  • Use:Sacred
  • Level:K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Chords:3
  • Topic:Praise, Spiritual
  • Language:English
  • Origin:African American Spiritual

Students will harmonize the song by ringing chords when indicated either by chart or color.

 

Kum-Bah-Yah (Ring & Sing)

  • Use:Sacred
  • Level:3 – 6
  • Topic:Praise, Spiritual
  • Language:English
  • Origin:African American Spiritual

Students will harmonize the song by reading the text and ringing when a word is outlined and damping when it is underscored.

Come by here is the translation of Kum-bah-yah.  This song has been passed down by mouth and has become a favorite of camps and meeting places.  Originally, it was sung by those in need.

 

Michael, Row the Boat Ashore

  • Use:Sacred, Secular
  • Level:K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type:Chords
  • Chords:3
  • Topic:Spiritual
  • Language:English
  • Origin:America

Students will harmonize the song by ringing chords when indicated either by chart or color.

Michael Row the Boat Ashore is an African American Spiritual first noted during the Civil War.

 

Peace Like a River

  • Use:Sacred, Secular
  • Level:K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type:Chords
  • Chords:3
  • Topic:Peace, Spiritual
  • Language:English
  • Origin:African American Spiritual

Students will harmonize the song by ringing chords when indicated either by chart or color.

Peace Like A River is an African American Spiritual.  The first three items of the “fruit of the Spirit” (Galatians 5:22) are love, joy, and peace. This spiritual compares the peace of God to a placidly flowing river, the joy of Christ to a merrily bubbling fountain, and the love of God to a deep, wide ocean.

 

From Singing to Ringing

  • Author/Composer/Arranger:Karen Thompson
  • Use:Sacred
  • Octaves Used – Select One:2 – 3 Octaves
  • Level:Level 1, Level 2
  • Topic:General
  • Origin:African American Spiritual
  • Use Caution with Techniques and/or Tempo:Caution

From Singing to Ringing is a valuable resource for teaching and reinforcing some basic, yet essential, music skills needed to ring handbells. Keeping a steady beat and visually tracking music from beat to beat (and measure to measure) are important skills that handbell ringers must accomplish to be successful. The conventional approach to aid in learning these two skills in a handchime/handbell setting is counting aloud by director and/or ringers. From Singing to Ringing serves the same purpose as counting aloud, but in a more enjoyable and engaging way.  Additionally, rhythms are easier to perform and internalize when sung. If they can sing it, they can ring it!

 

For the Handchime Ensemble

Five Spirituals

  • Author/Composer/Arranger:Bill Ingram
  • Use:Sacred
  • Octaves Used – Select One:2 – 3 Octaves
  • Level:Level 1, Level 1+
  • Topic:General
  • Origin:African American Spiritual
  • Use Caution with Techniques and/or Tempo:Caution

Bill Ingram continues the popular level one series with five attractive spirituals. One or two move into the level 1+ rating, offering good teaching opportunities while providing satisfying ringing experiences. These will be useful for school, church or concert venues.

 

Morning Songs

  • Author/Composer/Arranger:Bill Ingram
  • Use:Sacred
  • Octaves Used – Select One:2 – 3 Octaves
  • Level:Level 1
  • Topic:General
  • Origin:African American Spiritual, Ireland

Here is a set of three familiar melodies that share the theme of morning. The titles included are “Jesus in the Morning,” “Morning Has Broken,” and “My Lord, What a Morning.” The graduating levels of difficulty of the pieces make this set an ideal selection for the developing ensemble. Since the melodies are familiar, these are excellent teaching pieces to help ringers identify them on the page and work to bring them out when ringing. Because of their versatility, you may find yourself pulling these out every year.

 

Spirituals for Twelve Bells

  • Author/Composer/Arranger:Bill Ingram
  • Use:Sacred, Secular
  • Octaves Used – Select One:12 Note, Small Ensemble
  • Level:Level 2, Level 2+
  • Topic:General, Spiritual
  • Origin:African American Spiritual

As the volume of literature for 12 bells or chimes in F continues to grow, this collection of spirituals will be a welcome addition. The spirituals, listed below, range from lively and bold to reflective and meditative.  With no bell changes (thus no tables needed) there will be many opportunities to use these arrangements.  Contents:  Lord, I Want to Be a Christian; Steal Away; Great Day!; There Is a Balm in Gilead; Every Time I Feel the Spirit

Music Literacy in a Snap with Colors and Handchimes

A great New Year’s resolution for any teacher would be to introduce music literacy to more in 2018.  If you have handchimes at your disposal, teaching music reading with the help of colors couldn’t be simpler! At ChimeWorks, we have developed tools for teaching young children to develop eye-hand coordination using colors and symbols and then, systematically moving on to colored-coded notes on the staff and ultimately reading handchime/handbell notation.

We begin by using colors that are closely correlated to those used in Boomwhacker® and KidsPlay® systems.  Therefore, one will be able to use our lesson plans with handchimes and/or Boomwhackers and KidsPlay bells to teach music literacy.  Sensitivity is given to the use of colors alone due to the statistics that 1 in 12 males and 1 in 200 females suffer from color vision deficiency.  Along with a select color for each pitch we have allocated a shape modeled closely to those used in shape-note singing.

Coupled, these symbols are referred to as Icons – non-traditional symbols used to notate music.   They allow students to quickly “read” music without the worry of not knowing standard musical notation.   They also allow students to quickly express themselves at an early-learner stage with known symbols rather than struggling with music notation.  The use of icons develops eye-hand coordination rapidly allowing students to quickly adapt to numbers, pitch names, solfege and then standard music notation.

ChimeWorks has developed Colored Bands which can be wrapped around the handchime tube so that each student can identify a pitch with a color.  In the case of vision deficiency, the shape may also be drawn on to the band.  These bands are available for Malmark, Inc. and be found by clicking here.  Colored bands can be an effective tool in the classroom when denoting pitches and chords.  Using the ChimeWorks Icon Chart, each pitch is assigned a color.  By wrapping the appropriate colored band around the shaft of the handchime tube at the base, you can effectively indicate which handchimes are assigned to pitches or chords.

Since icons are used with non-music readers, they can be utilized with younger children.  These same children may not yet be literate and understand how to track from left to right.  We suggest that great success will be met when the icon chart is presented through a computer-generated slideshow presentation or interactive whiteboard so that the teacher may point to each shape tracking for the students in tempo and rhythm.

Once the students master the melody using icons, they may continue with the Chroma-note® (colored note head) score. Older students may meet success by just having the location of the pitch on the staff on the note designation label which is standard on all brands of handchimes and may be able to move quickly to the handchime score which is in standard music notation.

Icon lesson plans may be found here on the ChimeWorks website.  By introducing these easy to teach lessons, your students will color their world with music through handchimes.

You’ll Shine in the Light of the Silvery Moon with These Winter Concert Pieces

 

 

By now preparations are underway for your Winter Concert!  ChimeWorks has some suggestions for easy to teach songs with handchime accompaniment that will bring your program ringing success.

During this busy time of the year, let us do the work for you! The lesson plans below are available for immediate purchase and download from ChimeWorks and include goals for NAfMe music standards, objectives and process for teaching in addition to the music score.

Check out the titles below that will have you shining in the silvery moon:

Alleluia by Mozart

This popular melody is taken form Mozart’s larger work, Exultate Jubilate.

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 4
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Classical, Praise
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Germany

Alleluia Round

Alleluia Round is a traditional canon.  Its origin is unknown.

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Classical, General, Praise
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Unknown

Dona Nobis Pacem

Dona Nobis Pacem is a traditional song in round or canon form.  The text translates to Grant Us Peace and is taken from the Latin mass.  While the source of this canon is unknown, it is believed to date from the 16th century.

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 3
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Classical, Peace
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Europe

Gaudeamus Hodie

Gaudeamus Hodie translates to Let Us Rejoice Today!

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Christmas, General, Praise
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Europe

 Jubilate Deo

Jubilate Deo can be challenging as a six-part canon.  Adding the ostinati will make it sparkle.  The translation of the Latin is: O be joyful in the Lord.

  • Use: Sacred, Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Classical, General, Praise
  • Language: Latin
  • Origin: Europe

Now We Say Farewell

Now We Say Farewell is a two-part canon (round) published in Chapel Gems for Sunday Schools published in 1866.

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 3
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Farewell, Labor
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Ode To Joy

Ode To Joy was written by Ludwig van Beethoven and is part of the final movement of his Symphony No. 9.

  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Chords
  • Chords: 5
  • Topic: Classical
  • Language: English
  • Origin: Germany

Rise Up O, Flame

Rise Up, O Flame is a traditional campfire song sung by Girl Scouts in North America.

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: Classical
  • Language: English
  • Origin: England

Sing Together

Sing Together is a folk song of unknown origin.  It is a three-part canon or round.

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: K – 2, 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Canon: Yes
  • Topic: General, Music
  • Language: English
  • Origin: Unknown

Welcome Every Guest

While the song, Welcome Every Guest, appears in Walker’s Southern Harmony published in 1847, it can found earlier in Brownson’s Select Harmony published in 1783.  The reference to the Sacred Nine probably refers to the nine muses of Greek Mythology.  This would be a wonderful opening to a concert program.

  • Use: Secular
  • Level: 3 – 6
  • Type: Ostinati
  • Topic: Music
  • Language: English
  • Origin: America

 

The above lesson plans are on the ChimeWorks website and available at the low price of $2.29 each.  If you’re not already a member, log on for your two-week trial membership today!

One, Two…. Who Knew It Would Be This Easy!

So, you’d like to use handchimes in the general music classroom or children’s choir rehearsal but you’re not quite sure where to start?  We have the solution for you!

Start slowly – choose a folk song which you can teach by rote and has a melody that can be harmonized with two chords.  Once the text and melody are learnt, add handchimes in by having your students accompany their singing with chords.

Do this by distributing one handchime to each student and separate the students by chords having the students holding the common pitch stand in the center.  Practice each chord separately.  Then point to group one or two and practice ringing as indicated.

A chord chart indicating the chord by pitch name or color displayed by projector may also be used.  Simply point to the chord at the appropriate time.  This is a great way to begin teaching eye-hand coordination.  Consider putting Malmark’s colored bands on the handchimes to make chord recognition easier.

Begin to practice singing the song along with the chords indicating which chord is to be rung with the text.  If you don’t have enough handchimes to go around add some non-pitched percussion for added rhythm.  In no time, you’ll have music in a snap – of the wrist that is!

Here are some recommended folk songs from the ChimeWorks website that use two chords:

Eency, Weency Spider

Hava Nagila

Hey, Ho! Nobody Home

Hey, Lidee

O, Music, Sweet Music

Rocky Mountain

Six Little Ducks

Skip To My Lou

Using Colors to Teach Music – Some Things to Consider

Mention colors and music notation among two or music teachers and a debate will surely ensue. Proponents of using color coded music believe that the method is a surefire way of having instant success in making music while opponents may see it as dumbing down. Walking the center line may be the safest stand on this subject; here are a few considerations on the subject regarding handchimes and ringing along with suggestions for experiencing the best of both worlds.

As proponents of using colors to teach music literacy, we are very sensitive to those who cannot see color or experience color vision deficiency. About 8% of males and .5% of females experience this deficiency. Therefore, we advocate using colors along with a second method in all lesson plans. For instance, if using a color to indicate pitch also use a shape as a secondary indicator as used in the ChimeWorks Icon Chart.

Using Colors with Lesson Plans in the General Music Classroom or Choral Rehearsal
Colors are familiar and easily recognizable to most which makes them a great precursor to music notation to teach eye-hand coordination as well as tracking from left to right for pre-readers. One color may indicate a pitch as in using icons or it can signify a chord for creating harmonies while accompanying a melody. These methods are used by having a central focal point for the children to follow as indicated by the music leader. The use of an interactive whiteboard or projection is highly recommended.

When introducing music notation, a simple melody using colored note heads helps to simplify finding the correct space and line to follow on the staff. Once the concept of locating a specific pitch on the staff is taught, eliminating colors is encouraged.

Attaching a colored band to a handchime is an accessible means of designating an instrument to the appropriate pitch or chord. These functional bands are easily wrapped around the handchime tube, are effortlessly removed and can be reused.

Creating resources using colors is simple with the use of a computer. While working with Chroma-NotesTM notation in Finale PRINTMUSIC® is the simplest method of producing colored music notation, general resources can be produced in word processor software. An important aspect of creating resources is that you keep the colors and symbols consistent when assigning them to pitches. Using the ChimeWorks Icon Chart as referenced above, allows you to maintain uniformity when using available resources in the marketplace as well as creating your own.

Using Colors with the Handchime Ensemble
Long a source of debate in the ringing world is marking the handchime/handbell score. While these instruments are a great tool to teach music at any age and countless youth and adults have been able to learn music skills by ringing in a handchime/handbell ensemble, there has been contention along the way.

Early in the handbell movement, indicating when to ring the instrument in a particular hand was indicated by a circle around the note head often in red and blue. Through the years, experience taught us that using a circle may not be the best indicator as the marking distorted the score by blocking the purpose of a particular note head be it melody, counter-melody or harmony. Gradually, highlighters came into play. With the use of highlighters in two consistent colors for example, yellow for left hand and pink for right hand, the note will be designated without obstructing its purpose and any other markings such as dynamics, articulations or techniques.

While using highlighters to indicate notes in a score, the ringer can be trained to locate their assigned pitches and with standard handchime/handbell assignments, know that their left hand is ringing the pitch on the space and their right hand, the one on the line. It can, sometimes, be difficult to ween a ringer off the use of color coding a score. Adults have more difficulty losing this crutch than children, however, the ultimate goal is to use ringing as a tool to teach music literacy and to nurture musicians of all ages.